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News Release | Environment Massachusetts

New Report: A Turning Point for Massachusetts Offshore Wind Energy

Boston, MA (September 13, 2012) – Massachusetts can create jobs while powering our homes and businesses with local, clean energy, but only if our elected officials and regulators take the right steps now, according to a new report released today by the National Wildlife Federation and local partners Environment Massachusetts, Conservation Law Foundation, Environmental League of Massachusetts, and Sierra Club. The Turning Point for Atlantic Offshore Wind Energy: Time for Action to Create Jobs, Reduce Pollution, Protect Wildlife & Secure America’s Energy Future details the economic and environmental benefits of offshore wind energy, potential obstacles to progress, and a prosperous path forward.

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Report | Environment Massachusetts

The Turning Point for Atlantic Offshore Wind Energy

As America struggles to revitalize our economy, create jobs, secure an
energy independent future, and protect our communities and wildlife
from the dangers of climate change, one energy source offers a golden
opportunity to power our homes and businesses without creating more
pollution —– Atlantic offshore wind.

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Report | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

When it Rains, it Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Holyoke second in Commonwealth for solar power capacity

In a part of Massachusetts strong in solar power, the city of Holyoke is helping to lead the way, according to a new report released today by Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center. Holyoke has 4,527.00 kilowatts of installed photovoltaic capacity, ranking it second in the Commonwealth – behind only Boston, despite having less than 10% of the populations of the Bay State’s capital.

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Falmouth, Cape Cod, leading Massachusetts in Solar Development

Falmouth and Cape Cod are leading the way when it comes to solar power according to a new report released today by Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center. Falmouth has 127 individual solar installations, behind only Boston, with 157, despite having around 5% of the population of the Bay State’s capitol city.

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