Earlier this month, a group of legislators from both coasts signed onto a wave of eight bills in Congress aimed at blocking the Trump administration’s offshore drilling plan.

As we stare down apocalyptic news about the state of our oceans and life on earth, it’s good to take a step back and remind ourselves just what we are fighting for. For me, that means taking a (virtual) dive through the unique and otherworldly beauty that is the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument. For the uninitiated, the Canyons and Seamounts, located to the Southeast of Cape Cod, is a marine protected area--a blue park--that is designed to protect diverse and unique marine places from exploitation.

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Ben Hellerstein
State Director

Last Friday, the Trump administration released the 2018 update to the National Climate Assessment. This year’s update focuses on the effects of a changing climate on human well-being, our society, and our environment.

In the lifespan of the black coral, which can live for 500 years or more, two years is nothing. Yet, for the black coral that live 150 miles to the Southeast of Cape Cod, these last two years have been monumental--that is, they have marked the first years in which the black coral have enjoyed full protections from then-President Obama’s designation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument.

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John Rumpler
Senior Director, Clean Water for America Campaign and Senior Attorney

Why do we need federal protection under the Clean Water Act if there are also state laws designed to protect our rivers and streams? The answer is that, all too often, state officials fail to enforce their own laws or side with politically-powerful polluters.

We all want our teeth to be clean after brushing, and our bodies to be clean after showering, but did you know the products used in these everyday activities could be harming wildlife? Hundreds of commonly-used household products contain tiny plastic microbeads, which can be a big problem for our environment. 

Last year at this time, the toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie caused nearly half a million people in and around Toledo, Ohio, to be without safe drinking water. Clean water from our taps is something that many of us take for granted, but if we don’t protect our water sources — like the residents of Toledo discovered — we won’t be able to take it for granted anymore.